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razorgaze



Member Since: 18 Jan 2019
Location: dallas
Posts: 8

United States 2008 LR2 i6 SE Auto Baltic Blue
2008 LR2 Steering Pump Replacement Complete (extensive)

First off, a BIG hats off to p_gill who babysat me through my first serpentine belt replacement (as well as the reservoir and the tensioner pulley). He was instrumental in my decision to not only tackle the project, but also document it. And he was kind enough to not only point me to his own threads where he provided step-by-step instructions but other's threads as well, and even took my calls on more than a few occasions when I hit an impasse.

While all the info and tutorials are enough to get you through the process, there are holes that I think can be filled to make the process even smoother, which is what i hope my experience will do for you if you attempt to tackle it yourself.

DOs
Be patient
Make sure to have a SHORT 18/19 mm wrench
Know that the space you'll be working in is TIGHT. At times you will think "there ain't no way in hell...!" Hell and I both assure - there is a way.
Follow my pitfalls so you can avoid them
Consider ordering other parts you'll be exposed to while you're at the water pump (listed below with part numbers)

DON'TS
Be on a clock (it took me 7 hours; i was being cautious and trying to decipher what was actually going on with the pics i was looking at; but i'll say that by the third time - yes, third (i'll get to that) i was in and out of the hood in less than an hour)
Give up hope - it can be done (and with what I'm going to share, in a fourth of the time it took me; in fact, if i had to do the entire thing over again knowing what i know, i bet i could put the new belt on, swap out the idler pulley and tensioner in an hour, hour-and-a-half tops!)
Disregard my pitfalls. It will save you time and grief.
Be intimidated
Remove any fluid lines - it makes it harder on the front end but saves on the backend not having to bleed lines (AC, power steering, etc)

REFERENCE
Here are all of the links I was provided so you can familiarize yourself with everything. I'm a firm believer in the more complete a picture is painted, confidence increases while mistakes decrease.

p-gill tutorial on this forum
Tubolove tutorial on this forum
garyf's share of the LR2 manual

Idler Pulley Video 1

Idler Pulley Video 2

PARTS LIST
Best prices on OEM out there!
I ordered a couple of parts from these guys off ebay and the order came with a card to this site; hands down the cheapest supplier of OEM parts out there. Here is a list of everything you could replace if you have to do the belt (in no particular order):

LR006861 Water pump
LR006072 Water pump gasket
LR003203 Thermostat
LR006071 Thermostat Housing
LR001517 Thermostat gasket
LR005993 Drive pulley (special tool required to remove)
LR006076 Idler pulley
LR004667 Tensioner
LR007207 Power steering pump
LR009387 Power steering pump seal

BELT ROUTING


The larger loops to the left and right are the AC compressor (L) and the power steering pump pulley (R).

BELT NOTE: When putting on the belt, make sure the flat side is on the exterior and the grooves on the interior. Also, once you get the belt around passed the pumps, don't worry about putting it around the power steering pulley. Immediately, route the belt following the routing pic at the beginning, making sure to route the belt under the drive pulley. This will save you some from having to do what i did and remove the tensioner completely to route the belt.

SYMPTOMS
Steering wheel began grabbing and squealing on turns. Mild at first but progressively worsened. A European auto shop i use wanted to charge me $2800 and they did nothing more than pop the hood to show me that a third of my belt was missing and that I shouldn't drive. Anyway, after getting in i found the problem:

Click image to enlarge

Something seems, oh, i dunno, off. Like, the pulley!

The bearing seized and the belt just ground off the pulley. The exposed locking washer then sheared off the edge of the belt:

Click image to enlarge

Who knew washers could kill?

Though I didn't discover that the tensioner was missing its pulley until later, it was obvious from all the belt debris that something had gotten ahold of it.

INSTALLATION (belt, tensioner pulley in my case)

REPAIR PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE
There are a number of things p_gill and others have shared that can be attributed to squealing, like a dirty reservoir, fluid, etc. So, as they did, I recommend start with the easy stuff before going deep under the hood.

Try replacing the reservoir and fluid

No-bleed Reservoir Replacement

Belt Installation Overview:

  1. Disconnect MAF sensor
  2. Disconnect intake
  3. Remove air cleaner housing
  4. Remove the battery and tray
  5. Lock the tensioner open
  6. Remove the AC compressor
  7. Remove bracket between ac compressor and steering pump
  8. Free the bracket behind steering pump (remove the top bolt; only loosen the bottom)
  9. Remove the power steering pump and the pulley

Disconnect MAF
Squeeze the small tab at the bottom while grasping the sides of the connection on top of the air intake and pulling

Disconnect Intake
Pretty obvious: squeeze the spring ring and separate

Remove Cabin Filter Box
TIP: no need to remove the cover or the filter. The entire housing comes off intact. Just pull straight up to remove the legs from the rubber grommets.

Remove Battery and Tray
To release tray, pull slightly up and back

Lock Open the Tensioner

Click image to enlarge

roughly, the correct orientation of the tensioner while on the vehicle

Here's where the short 18/19 mm wrench is key. If you have it, great! All you need to do is use it to push down the tensioner (top, right "hook") all the way. And when you think you've gone far enough - you haven't. You have to go far. While you're applying pressure (and the wrench is grinding into your palm), you need to slip the hex key into the hole. You'll know if you've applied enough tension when, as you ease off the tension, the hex key is shouldering all the tension. And you're onto the next step.

If, however, all tension is returned back to the belt, you haven't gone far enough. Try again, young Jedi. Once you get it locked open, move to the next step, Removing the AC Compressor. Otherwise, continue reading if your wrench is too long (that's what she said) or just can't seem to get the tensioner to lock open.

Long Wrench Solution (you'll need two wrenches)
So, I tried this both ways, with and without tension on the belt. The only real advantage of the belt under tension is you have access to that part where the wrench fits. However, if your wrench is too long, the power steering pump will prevent you from releasing enough tension to successfully drop the hex key into the hole to lock it open. Even positioning your wrench to extend between the steering pump pulley and the pump itself won't allow it because the axle of the pump obstructs you completely.

When p_gill said you have to "push down far" he meant it. You have to push far.

First, you'll need to remove the AC compressor so jump to the next step and then finish reading below...

Oh, hey. That was fast. OK, with all of the bolts holding the compressor on removed, place one of your wrenches on the cabin-side of the tensioner (top, right hook in pic) and push back as far back as you can go. Then find something long (i used a socket extension), go under the supply line of the steering pump, over the wrench handle and into a hole of the power steering pulley effectively wedging open the tensioner (see pick). With tension now off of the belt, you can move the AC compressor out of the way. With tension on the belt you can't do that.

Click image to enlarge

Tension is relieved so you can move the AC compressor

With the compressor freed from its mount and out of the way, use one of the wrenches to access the tensioner from the front (left hook in pic). Going straight back (right, toward cabin) will cause you to bang against the brake vacuum so you will need to go slightly back then slightly right to clear the housing (it's not much more clearance, but it's enough). Now, while you're holding tension from the front, tension on the back will be relieved allowing you to take the wrench and turn it so the angle of the wrench is pointed up. Doing so gives you about another half- to full inch clearance than if it was pointed with the angle down.

This will allow you to push the tensioner to its stopping point and allow the hex key to successfully lock it open.

Remove the AC Compressor
Remove the 3 bolts on the black plate that runs from the engine block to the bottom of the AC Compressor.

Click image to enlarge

Remove support by rotating counterclockwise 90-degrees and sliding under conduit

Remove the 3 other bolts holding the compressor

With tension off the belt, and the bolts removed, you can now move the compressor. I found that moving it forward allowed me to remove the belt from the compressor pulley more easily. once you get the belt off, move the compressor back and as far left as you can manage. This does two things: allows you to see the drive pulley below (not visible in this pic) AND gives you access to the tensioner bolt in the event you have to remove it as I did.

Click image to enlarge

Compressor moved back and left, exposing the drive pulley (not visible) and the tensioner bolt (red)

Remove Braces Between Compressor and PS Pump and from the PS Pump Itself
TIP: Don't remove the lower bolt on the power steering pump. I didn't because I knew it looked to impossible to get back on (p_gill did and confirmed it's as bad as it seems). Just loosen it enough so you don't remove but that when you remove the top one, the bracket moves freely without impeding separation of the pump.

Remove Power Steering Pump
Now for the fun part. Honestly, it's not as difficult as I thought it would be to remove the PS pump. It's awkward but doable. The real challenge is everything behind it. ugh boy.

The 2 bolts you need to remove are located here:
Click image to enlarge

The second bolt is in the same spot on the other side. Use a socket to access.

Separate Power Steering Pulley from Water Pump
Two Torx screws are all that's keeping you from separating everything at this point. At first it doesn't seem like you can access. With some angling, I found the perfect way:

Click image to enlarge

Come in with your tool from behind the supply line.

Now that the bolts are off comes perhaps what i consider to be the absolute test of patience and sanity: getting the power steering pump out of the way. Behind the steering pump is the water pump. Between these two are the components that spin the water pump, specifically a spring. FORTUNATELY mine never separated with the water pump, but p_gill warned me that it might and that if it did it needs to be reinserted correctly. Otherwise, expect a "clicking" if i recall his words.

So, with everything unscrewed, pull out and away from the engine and lift up to clear a small lip/ridge of the engine bay housing. According to p_gill's updated tutorial, removing the high pressure line of the power steering makes this job considerably easier. To be honest, with it attached and if the spring came out with the power steering pump, i just don't see how you could get the spring back in much less determine if you did it correctly - there is JUST. NO. ROOM. You can't see anything. And i barely had enough room to slide the belt in there.

Belt Removal/Replacement
At any rate, pull out on the steering pump until you're able to remove the old belt and/or install the new one. With any luck, your spring remains intact. If not, p_gill's updates should at least keep you going. Here is the pic he supplied (note the spring at the bottom):

Click image to enlarge


If your spring doesn't come out with the ps pump, all you will need to do to reinstall the pump is make sure the black points (where the 2 green arrows are) go into the respective holes on the power steering pulley. To get the steering pump back onto the water pump, angle the pump so the bottom of the pulley clears the lip/ridge of the engine bay first. You'll need to spin the water pump or pulley so that the black "pins" line up. As long as they go in and everything lines up, you're good to go.

At this point, you are fully aware of the cluster that is the belt replacement. It only makes sense to replace parts you already have access to (most of which are fairly inexpensive): power steering (pricey, even at $500 though JCWhitney has an A1 Cardone for $175 after 15% off with email address), tensioner, pulleys, water pump (i think the thermostat is in this area but looking at the manual really quickly for pics, I think i saw that it's at the front of the engine).

Regardless, it's something to consider. I didn't have the luxury of preparing in advance but knowing what I'm against, I don't mind going back in to replace these parts soon. However, I'm sure there will be something you have to deal with then that you don't have to now if you're only replacing the belt - fluids.

You Made It!
If you got this far, congratulations! You're home free. Here's the wrap-up:

  • Route the belt following the pic at the beginning of this guide
  • Replace the 2 TORX screws on the steering pulley
  • Reattach the ps pump's 2 screws
  • Reattach the bracket that secures the back of the ps pump
  • Replace the brace between the ps pump and the ac compressor
  • Realign and partially rethread all but the one screw that will also feed through the black bracket atop the compressor and engine block
  • Reinstall the black bracket then reattach screws, including the final compressor one
  • Reinstall the battery tray and battery
  • Reinsert the air intake housing
  • Reconnect the MAF sensor

Finally, congratulate yourself for a job well done.

Post #366439 14th Feb 2019 1:18 pm
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Greybeard



Member Since: 10 Aug 2010
Location: E Sussex
Posts: 155

United Kingdom 2008 Freelander 2 TD4 GS Auto Zermatt Silver

Congratulations to you for an amazing write up. Thank you. Thumbs Up

Post #366452 14th Feb 2019 4:26 pm
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razorgaze



Member Since: 18 Jan 2019
Location: dallas
Posts: 8

United States 2008 LR2 i6 SE Auto Baltic Blue

thanks, greybeard! It was a challenge but seriously - do it once and you can do it a 1000 times.

Post #366453 14th Feb 2019 4:35 pm
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p_gill



Member Since: 06 Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 466

United States 2008 Freelander 2 i6 SE Auto Tambora Flame

Excellent post!!!

Thanks for sharing all of the details.

And as you correctly pointed out it is only really hard the first time.


One last thought.

The engine on this Freelander II is over 10 years old and it has taken the vehicle more than 200,000 miles.

That is a long way to go on the original belt.

And even when the pulley seized the belt didn't immediately fail.

I think some credit goes to the Team that built the engine and the Team that did the final assembly. Thumbs Up

Far too often we complain when things fail prematurely (I know that I am guilty of this)

But how often do we send our compliments when things far exceed expectations.

Take care

Paul

Post #366466 14th Feb 2019 8:09 pm
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razorgaze



Member Since: 18 Jan 2019
Location: dallas
Posts: 8

United States 2008 LR2 i6 SE Auto Baltic Blue

paul, fantastic point.

though i am the second owner (got it in 2010 and it had 85K miles on it already; it was a pharm salesman's car) i have had no major issues. Over the life of the vehicle i've paid to have the master brake cylinder and starter replaced; about a year or so ago i replaced the radiator and now the belt.

Currently, it has 212200 miles on it and i couldn't be happier with it. Hands down best vehicle purchase i've ever made. In fact, i am now and forever a land rover driver.

Post #366468 14th Feb 2019 8:15 pm
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Turbo_Boss



Member Since: 22 Nov 2019
Location: Panama Rep. of Panama - Central America
Posts: 10

Panama 

Hey Razorgaze,

Amazing job! Thanks for taking the time on making this step by step DYI Instruction. Bow down

I Reach this post thanks to P-Gil. I am about to change the pulleys and the serpentine belt in my 2008 Volvo XC90 3.2

I have read yours and P-Gil instructions several times but I do not understand what you mean when you mention:

Quote:
Remove Braces Between Compressor and PS Pump and from the PS Pump Itself
TIP: Don't remove the lower bolt on the power steering pump. I didn't because I knew it looked to impossible to get back on (p_gill did and confirmed it's as bad as it seems). Just loosen it enough so you don't remove but that when you remove the top one, the bracket moves freely without impeding separation of the pump


I would appreciate it if you could show me what screw you mean.

Also about the tool to take out the Drive Pulley, can you confirm if you used a 33 Teeth Spline Socket? Also what size of Torx Driver did you use? a T50?

Thanks so much for your time and help

Isaac

Post #381866 28th Nov 2019 3:44 am
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razorgaze



Member Since: 18 Jan 2019
Location: dallas
Posts: 8

United States 2008 LR2 i6 SE Auto Baltic Blue

yes! Paul is the master. He and his posts have been a fantastic resource.

re: braces: you'll know once you get in there. there are roughly 3 "braces" that reinforce the power steering assembly.

1 of the 3 is a smaller bracket, one end of which connects to the the center of the of the ps pump, the other that angles a bit and connects to the body. It's this bottom screw that only needs to be loosened (the top can be removed). you'll see what i'm talking about once you get in there as you cannot remove the ps pump without removing/loosening this bracket.

here is the tool info: https://www.freel2.com/forum/topic31456-15.html

let me know if i can answer anything else. I'll also go through the pics and see if i can find a shot of the ps bracket i'm talking about.

m

Post #381940 29th Nov 2019 2:09 am
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razorgaze



Member Since: 18 Jan 2019
Location: dallas
Posts: 8

United States 2008 LR2 i6 SE Auto Baltic Blue

the bracket is in red and the bolt that shouldn't be completely removed (IMO) is circled in blue. The top bolt (not circled) can be removed.

Post #381941 29th Nov 2019 2:56 am
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Turbo_Boss



Member Since: 22 Nov 2019
Location: Panama Rep. of Panama - Central America
Posts: 10

Panama 

razorgaze wrote:
yes! Paul is the master. He and his posts have been a fantastic resource.

1 of the 3 is a smaller bracket, one end of which connects to the the center of the of the ps pump, the other that angles a bit and connects to the body. It's this bottom screw that only needs to be loosened (the top can be removed). you'll see what i'm talking about once you get in there as you cannot remove the ps pump without removing/loosening this bracket.


Hey Razorgaze,

Thx for your fast reply. Now I understand what screw bracket you was talking about.

I will remove the top screw...... Loose the one at the bottom and the bracket will fall to one side or the other..... And then I can slide back the PS... Thumbs Up

I am mentally reviewing what I should do and thus not encounter problems Mr. Green

I will keep you guys updated

Thank for your time and help

Isaac

Post #381942 29th Nov 2019 4:17 am
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razorgaze



Member Since: 18 Jan 2019
Location: dallas
Posts: 8

United States 2008 LR2 i6 SE Auto Baltic Blue

Quote:
Loose the one at the bottom and the bracket will fall to one side or the other..... And then I can slide back the PS..


ahh if it were only that easy Wink Not removing the lower screw has its challenges. The main being the bracket will have limited mobility. The more you loosen the more it will move out of the way. It will get in your way while trying to remove the PS.

Use your judgement whether you feel comfortable removing the lower screw completely. I found that it would be nearly impossible to get it back on. YMMV. In fact, i've done repairs of this size twice now and haven't removed it yet and think it saves time and headache by not doing so.

keep us posted!

Post #381972 29th Nov 2019 5:36 pm
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p_gill



Member Since: 06 Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 466

United States 2008 Freelander 2 i6 SE Auto Tambora Flame

Turbo_Boss wrote:


Also about the tool to take out the Drive Pulley, can you confirm if you used a 33 Teeth Spline Socket? Also what size of Torx Driver did you use? a T50?


Isaac


T50 torx and 33 teeth sounds exactly right

Here is what I used

https://www.idparts.com/metalnerd-serrated...p-564.html

Good luck

Paul

Post #382003 30th Nov 2019 3:11 am
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Turbo_Boss



Member Since: 22 Nov 2019
Location: Panama Rep. of Panama - Central America
Posts: 10

Panama 

p_gill wrote:
T50 torx and 33 teeth sounds exactly right

Here is what I used: https://www.idparts.com/metalnerd-serrated...p-564.html

Good luck

Paul.


Hey Paul

Well I just ordered a bunch of parts Mr. Green

Pulleys, tensioner, serpentine belt, O Rings..........

My Coolant reservoir has engine oil in it and I am pretty sure is not the head gasket, so I order a Oil Cooler (the one that goes attached to the Oil Filter Housing.

Also order a thermostat and the hoses............ I am thinking on removing the Instake Manifold to change the Oil Coolant and Thermostat

Hope I haven´t forget anything else Rolling Eyes

Don´t know exactly when I will receive all the parts in my country.......... I will keep you guys updated and will do my best to take photos

Thx & Rgs

Isaac


Last edited by Turbo_Boss on 29th Dec 2019 6:41 pm. Edited 1 time in total

Post #382004 30th Nov 2019 6:27 am
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p_gill



Member Since: 06 Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 466

United States 2008 Freelander 2 i6 SE Auto Tambora Flame

Isaac,

Good Luck

Let us know how it works out.

Take care

Paul

Post #382119 2nd Dec 2019 9:10 pm
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Turbo_Boss



Member Since: 22 Nov 2019
Location: Panama Rep. of Panama - Central America
Posts: 10

Panama 

Hey Guys,

First, I want to thanks P_Gil and Razogaze for taking the time on making this step by step DYI Instruction. Bow down

This DYI is idiot proof and help me a lot in order to understand all the things involved on this repair

In my own opinion, if you follow this DYI, this repair is a piece of cake and the only difficult part is removing one of the screws on the power steering pump (The one on the fire wall side).

I decide to take my car to the mechanic and stay there with him showing how to replace the belt and pulleys.

He has never changed a belt in a Volvo so when he opened the hood, he was very happy I was there…… I also took with me some photos I print of the procedure and parts we needs to remove in order to explain better to him.

So here are some advices / constructive criticism of what we do different.

Keep in mind that my car is a 2008 Volvo XC90 3.2 AWD so maybe some of my advices does not work on you model car.

After removing the 3 bolts on the black plate that runs from the engine block to the upper and bottom of the AC Compressor, we remove the Brake Booster Pump. This allows you to have more space to put your hands and work better.

Then we remove the pulley that is at the right of the Brake Booster Pump and we got the belt to be very loose.

Since we was going to install a new belt, we cut it with a knife and this way we don’t lose time relieving tension from the damage Tensioner Pulley

This will help us moving forward the AC Compressor and have immediate access to the screw that’s hold the Tensioner Pulley………….In order to remove this screw we use a joint Swivel Socket Adapter.

We also use this joint Swivel Socket Adapter with a long extension to remove one of the screws that hold the power steering pump. This screw in the fire wall side and is almost impossible to see this screw…… You have to put your hand there and fill it with your fingers, connect the socket and hold it there while somebody with a long extension and ratchet tighter it.

So here it how I started the day taking the car to my mechanic Mr. Green




Here you can see the screw thats hold the tensioner pulley



Here you can see we removed the Brake Booster Pump and Pulley and this give us more space to work.



Here is a view with the removed Brake Booster Pump and pulley all of the way. This will give you better way to view when you are passing the new belt between the the Steering Pump Pulley and the Water Pump.



Here is a view of using a long extension with a joint Swivel Socket Adapter to remove one of the screws that hold the power steering pump.



Here you can see my mechanic following my printed photos Very Happy

Click image to enlarge


Here you can see my damage Tensioner Pulley and Pulley. I also replaced the O Rings on the Brake Booster Pump.



Here you can see everything put together with the new Tensioner Pulley, Pulley and New Belt and ready to install the Brake Booster Pump.



Here replacing the O Rings on The Brake Booster Pump



After he finish the job, he use a pressure gun with liquid degreaser to clean the complete area that was cover with dirt and residual oil from the leak............ I hope that the New O Rings on the Brake Booster Pump cure the oil leak.

Here are the parts I use:

Tow Away Truck was cover by my insurance
INA Tensioner Pulley (says is made in Germany)
Sweaden Pro Parts Pulley (Says it made in Taiwan)
Continental Contitech Bell (Says is made in UK)
O Rings Kit to fix Brake Booster Pump $25.oo at https://www.rkxtech.com/

I spend in parts around US$150.oo and my Mechanic labor was US$190.oo

I hope this info help any one that need to do this job.

Thx & Rgs

Isaac

Last edited by Turbo_Boss on 29th Dec 2019 5:53 pm. Edited 1 time in total

Post #383381 28th Dec 2019 8:52 pm
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p_gill



Member Since: 06 Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 466

United States 2008 Freelander 2 i6 SE Auto Tambora Flame

Isaac,

That’s an awesome result

Well done.

Your XC90 looks to be in great condition.

Have an amazing new year with your amazing XC90.

Take care

Paul

Post #383385 29th Dec 2019 1:36 am
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